14 Most Hilariously Named Places in the World

There are just some place names in the world where you have to wonder what the people who named them were thinking when they settled on that name. Did they not realize how ridiculous it is, or did they just not care? We may never know. In any case, please enjoy this list of hilariously named places… I dare you not to laugh out loud at some of them.

toad-suck-arkansasDirk Ercken / Shutterstock

Toad Suck, Arkansas

Toad Suck is a small town in Arkansas, supposedly named after the fact that people there used to sit in the tavern, suck on a liquor bottle and swell up like toads. More likely, it’s a crude translation from French, perhaps “eau d’sucre” meaning “sweet water.” Yeah, they should have stuck with the name Sweet Water, probably.

idiotville-oregonLoloStock / Shutterstock

Idiotville, Oregon

Idiotville is a ghost town, long abandoned. The name was given in jest, because back when it was inhabited, folks said you had to be an idiot to live there. Eventually, the river was named the Idiot River, and soon the name was applied on official maps of the town.

ding-dong-texasjackapong / Shutterstock

Ding Dong, Texas

A powerful family called the Bells lived here at one time, running businesses and working in politics. At some point a sign was made for one of their shops in the shape of a bell, with the words Ding Dong written underneath. As the town grew, the name stuck. Go figure.

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