3 Underrated Destinations in Peru

You finally booked your trip to South America, that one you’ve been craving for such a long time. You’ve researched about many popular destinations like the Salt Flats in Bolivia and the Atacama Desert in Chile – and of course, you can’t wait to see the famous Inca city of Machu Picchu in Peru.

Yes, Machu Picchu is beautiful — I almost cried when I walked around the city, marveling at those perfect walls with their massive stones meticulously attached to each other. But what if I told you that Peru has a lot more to offer?

Michael Zysman / Shutterstock.com

If you look carefully, you’ll find stunning beaches along the coast, dense forest in the northeast and even the remains of civilizations older than the Incas in the north of the country.

Let me pique your interest:

1. Huanchaco

This city is located on the north coast of Peru, around 600 km above Lima. It’s just 20 minutes away from Trujillo and when you arrive there, you somehow feel instantly welcomed. It has this special energy that only beach cities in warm countries have — a very laid back attitude coupled with smiles all around.

[resp]

Although I prefer green landscapes, I was mesmerized by the dry scenery. The whole of the coast is situated on the west side of the Andes and it creates a microclimate that resembles a desert.

Matyas Rehak / Shutterstock.com

You can spend lazy afternoons watching the surfers aptly weaving the perfect waves while you catch some sun. Then, you can stuff your face with the freshest ceviche you’ll find in Peru and finish your day at the pier, taking in the magical sunset over the Pacific.

2. Chachapoyas

If you’re coming from the coast of Peru, you’ll find in Chachapoyas the opposite of beach, sun and desert. The people who lived there were once called “The Cloud People,” as the area is covered with cloud forest.

Because it’s located in the Andes, it’s also a lot colder and wetter, but the views are breathtaking — rich green hills crisscrossed by powerful rivers.

A couple of hours away you’ll find Kuelap, which is in my opinion, Machu Picchu’s biggest contender. It’s the lost city of the Chachapoyas and, probably due to its secretness, it’s almost unspoiled. You’ll find round structures covered in moss and bromeliads as you walk around trying to understand how the people lived so high up in the mountains.

Matyas Rehak / Shutterstock.com

3. Iquitos

Since I was a child, I’ve heard tales about Iquitos and how dangerous it was. Compared to other Peruvian cities, it’s indeed chaotic, and you should definitely be aware of your surroundings so you don’t get in trouble.

But the beauty of Iquitos is the area in which it’s located: The Amazon. You can only get there by boat or by plane, and once you arrive, you’ll have a myriad of jungle tours to choose from. Thoroughly research each one of them and then make the most of it!

Dr. Morley Read / Shutterstock.com

It’s an amazing experience to explore such a dense and untouched forest. You’ll come across massive spiders, giant frogs, scary snakes and insects you never knew existed. You might swim with the river dolphins or even go fishing for piranhas!

PAGE 1 OF 2
SHARE ON

Advertisement

10 Interesting New Year’s Traditions from Around the World

In the Gregorian calendar, which is the most widely-used calendar system in the world, the start of the New Year is celebrated on January 1. In North America, bottles of champagne are popped, kisses are exchanged, and everyone sings and makes noise to celebrate the arrival of the New Year. Some traditions that we take part in are unique to our culture, even if it seems like everyone does them. In other parts of the globe, the celebration of the New Year looks quite different — some cultures even celebrate it on a completely separate day.

Weirdest American Holiday Traditions

The holiday season is here and businesses across the United States are going all-out to make sure that their decorations are better than the year before. The majority of Americans get so excited about holidays that it’s easy to forget how many traditions are strangely unique to the American culture. Actually, there are a large number of uniquely American holiday traditions that seem strange to those who didn’t grow up here. Let’s explore some of the weirdest American holiday traditions that are out there today.

The World in Liquor

When you go out for a night, how many options for liquor does your home base bar have on offer? Sure, they’ve probably got some standard gins, vodkas, rums, whiskies, and tequilas—but probably not much of anything else. If you’re traveling, one of the best ways to start to get to know the local culture is to indulge in a popular local drink.