6 Surprising Facts About the Eiffel Tower

One of the most popular tourist attractions in the world, the Eiffel Tower has a history almost as long and varied as the history of its home city, Paris. Built in 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 World Fair, the Eiffel Tower has survived 2 wars, a con artist trying to sell it for scrap metal, and uncountable lighting strikes. Read on for some little-known facts about the Eiffel Tower you may not have heard before.

its-illegal-to-take-pictures-at-nightpisaphotography / Shutterstock

1. It’s Illegal to Take Pictures of the Eiffel Tower at Night

The Eiffel Tower has 20,000 lightbulbs that are embedded into its frame: 5,000 on each side. Every day from dusk until 1am, they light up and sparkle for 5 minutes every hour. The structure of the tower itself is public domain. However, the light show that happens for 5 minutes every hour is considered artwork, and as a result is the property of the Société d’Exploitation de la Tour Eiffel (SETE), the company that operates the lights. In order to reproduce or share photos of the illuminated tower at night, you must first seek permission, and pay copyrights to SETE.

the-eiffel-tower-was-almost-disassembledkrivinis / Shutterstock

2. The Eiffel Tower Was Almost Disassembled for Expo 1967 in Montreal

In 1960, the mayor of Montreal, Jean Drapeau, negotiated a secret agreement with French president Charles de Gaulle to disassemble the Eiffel Tower and rebuild it in Montreal for the 1967 Universal Exposition. Drapeau was hoping for the tower to serve as a temporary landmark and tourist attraction for the Expo. Studies were carried out in secret, figuring out how best to dismantle and ship the tower over the ocean to Montreal. However, the plan was scrapped because the company that oversees operations of the tower was worried that once Expo was finished, the government would try and put the tower somewhere else, instead of bringing it back to Paris.

eiffel-tower-played-crucial-role-in-the-battle-of-marneKanuman / Shutterstock

3. The Eiffel Tower Played a Crucial Role in the Battle of the Marne in WWI

Many people don’t realize, but the Eiffel Tower played a crucial role in World War One, as a radio transmission device. During the war, French officers were able to exchange radio messages with places as far off as Arlington, Virginia. In 1914, a radio transmitter that was located at the top of the tower managed to scramble German radio communications, which seriously hindered their march on Paris. This delay bought the Allied troops enough time to rally, and many people believe that this helped them secure a victory at the First Battle of the Marne.

PAGE 1 OF 2
SHARE ON

Advertisement

A Guide to Glamping

If you’re one of those people who like the idea of being outdoorsy but can’t bear the thought of leaving behind your comfy mattress, tastefully decorated surroundings, and indoor plumbing, then “glamping” might be for you. Glamping is all about combining the fun of camping with the conveniences of home and the hip ambiance of your favorite Instagram celebrity's feed. If you’re eager to try glamping, here’s everything you need to know before you start planning your own relaxing, fun and oh so stylish night under the stars.

8 Essential TSA Tips for Summer Travel

Summer is the perfect time of year to get out there and travel — whether it's within this great country of ours or to an exotic foreign locale and everybody seems to be doing it — unfortunately this means packed airports and long security lines. In fact this year, the TSA (Transportation Security Administration) estimates that they will be even busier than usual and expect to see more than 243 million passengers and crew pass through security between Memorial Day and Labour Day.

The World in Chips

Even if you’re an adventurous eater, chances are you tend to stick to your old favorites when it comes to snack food. Everyone loves curling up on the couch with a brew, or a can of soda, and a huge bag of potato chips. Proven favorites like sour cream and onion, salt and vinegar, and barbecue are some of the most popular in the United States, but have you ever thought about what kind of chips people on the other side of the world are tucking into?