Fall Traditions from Around the World

Fall is a time of celebration for many cultures around the world. It’s a time to gather your harvest, and celebrate all that was achieved in the first part of the year.

In the United States, we have Thanksgiving as our primary fall celebration, but around the world, each different culture has an equivalent fall tradition that’s equally important, and brings families together to celebrate the season. If you’re a world traveler on the go this fall, check out some of these amazing and unique festivals.

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    1. Dia de Muertos – Mexico

    Dia de Muertos stems from an ancient Aztec traditional holiday celebrating the goddess Mictecacihuatl, the Lady of the Underworld. It has become a day for Mexicans both in Mexico and living elsewhere in the world to celebrate their ancestors, and the members of their family who have passed away.

    To celebrate this holiday, people build shrines in their home, and fill them with treats for the dead. They then visit the cemetery to visit the souls of the deceased. The tone of the holiday is happy and upbeat. People take turns telling anecdotes and funny stories about their deceased family members, and children are presented with treats in the shape of skulls and skeletons.

    Dina Julayeva / Shutterstock

    2. MassKara Festival – Philippines

    Although it’s still considered a relatively new festival (having first started in the 1980s), the MassKara Festival has become a huge part of life in Bacolod City, Philippines.

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    It all began when a national tragedy coincided with a global drop in sugar price, which hurt Bacolod City disproportionally hard because their main export is sugar. In order to bring the city back to life, the local government decided to have a festival, which they called the MassKara Festival. Held on the last Sunday in October, the festival features dance competitions, and plenty of chances to get dressed up and masquerade through the city streets.

    hijodeponggol / Shutterstock

    3. Guy Fawkes Night – England

    Each November 5, English citizens celebrate Guy Fawkes Night. This holiday commemorates an aborted attempt by Catholic revolutionary Guy Fawkes to blow up the House of Lords and kill the Protestant King James I.

    It was first celebrated in 1605, when grateful subjects built bonfires to cheer the King’s survival only hours earlier. The celebrations were made official after that, and now, every November 5, bonfires and fireworks explode all over England. Many people burn Guy Fawkes in effigy, sing songs, and celebrate the injection of a little mayhem into everyday life.

    Mitotico / Shutterstock

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    The World in Chili

    Chili is one of those comforting fall dishes that just hits the spot on a cool, crisp day. A good bowl of chili is warm, spiced just right, and features enough protein to keep you full for ages. We can all agree on the merits of a bowl of chili, but for a lot of people, that’s where most agreements stop. There are so many different kinds of chili that are popular around the world — most centered in the United States, which has definitely become the world’s capital of chili.

    The Best Comforting Drinks for Fall from Around the World

    As the weather starts getting colder, we start looking for comforting drinks that will help keep us warm.  Some of the most popular options in America are also the easiest to find — there are more than 13,000 Starbucks locations in the United States alone, and they have a huge percentage of the market cornered already — people love their pumpkin spice lattes! However, there are a lot of downsides to visiting a café every day, especially if your go-to order is a sweetened latte or Frappuccino. It’s easy to make delicious warm drinks at home, which allows you to flavor them to your taste, saving both money and calories

    Don’t Fall for These 10 Scary Traveler Scams

    Hopping aboard a transcontinental flight on route to a new, ready-to-explore destination is a rush. Traveling teaches us about the world, sure. But, more than that, it teaches us about ourselves. You also probably already know that, unlike your comfort zone, traveling presents a lot of inherent risks. It’s a sad reality, but it’s a reality that rings true. You, as a tourist, are a two-bit criminal’s dream target. After all, you have absolutely no idea where you are, no idea where to go for help, and no clue what the scammers have in store.