Slurp It Up: The Best Ramen Restaurants in the World

As more food cultures make their way to North America, it’s normal to see restaurants advertising “their” versions of classics from other cultures.

One food that has been heavily adapted to the North American palate is ramen, which is available in most large cities and has even made appearances in smaller towns. In Japan, ramen is a national specialty, and each region prides themselves on their own flavor profile, toppings, and preparation method, ranging from the miso broth of Hokkaido to the thin noodles and rich pork broth of Hakata ramen.

Today, we’ve brought you some of the best ramen restaurants — known as ramen-ya — in the world. Each restaurant has a different specialty, and all are equally worthy of the reverence and delight they inspire in their customers.

1. Kagari – Ginza, Tokyo

This ramen-ya, which opened in 2013 in Ginza, quickly inspired legions of fans who come from all over the world to enjoy their legendary tori paitan-style ramen. Tori paitan broth is made with chicken, and is rich, thick, and cloudy white, full of fat from the chicken bones and feet.

After the broth is ladled over top of the noodles, the bowl is topped with a soft-boiled egg whose yolk is just starting to turn to rich jelly, and fresh spring vegetables like Brussels sprouts and asparagus. The use of these fresh vegetables is quite unusual and brings a delicate freshness to the rich bowl.

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