Why Travel is So Addictive

You might have heard about the “travel bug,” the elusive insect which carries the condition that afflicts hundreds of thousands of travelers. It usually only takes one trip (or one bite) for you to catch it, but once you do, it’s, fortunately, incurable. You’ll live the rest of your life with it, only thinking about traveling, saving money to travel and hopefully, traveling a lot!

And the more you travel, the more you want to do it. Yes, traveling is addictive, but for all the right reasons. It’s crazy that even when you have a bad experience, it usually becomes a funny story for you to tell your friends later on.

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    So, what is it about traveling that gets so many people hooked?

    1. It’s an Adventure

    Unless you’re going on a boring business trip, traveling, for the most part, equals having fun. It’s the chance you have to put your explorer hat on and brave uncharted lands. You never know exactly what’s going to happen, and that alone can be quite exciting.

    Instead of taking things for granted, even the most mundane things – like buying a bottle of water – can be hard if you don’t speak the local language. So, for a moment in time, every aspect of your life becomes a daily adventure and you don’t need to try hard to enjoy it.

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    2. You Learn More About Yourself

    If you’ve ever told a friend who’s traveled for a long time that she came back acting like a totally different person, it’s because she really changed. When you’re having so many peculiar experiences every day, you learn a lot about yourself.

    The best thing is there’s no one to judge you; no friends or family expecting you to behave in a certain way. Because of that you can truly be yourself. Or even better, become the person you really want to be. So, if you happen to discover something cool about yourself, it naturally becomes part of your personality.

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    3. The World Becomes Smaller

    Have you ever seen someone identify themself as a world citizen? When you visit so many places and cultures, instead of looking at the differences, you tend to look for all the similarities. It’s not “me” and “you” anymore, it’s “us.”

    All of a sudden you have this unique feeling of not belonging to your home country, but to the Earth as a whole. And even when you think about a nation that’s far away, your memories are still very real, bridging the distance between you.

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