Pub Crawl: The Top Pubs in Ireland

In Ireland, pubs are where families connect, relationships are built, and sweet golden whiskey is enjoyed with enthusiasm. If you’re ever in Ireland, you must make it your mission to visit as many of these pubs as you possibly can, even if you aren’t a devoted beer or whiskey drinker.

Pubs in Ireland are a central part of the local culture and family life, and many people find it impossible to pick their favorite. Others insist that the best pub is always your local, where people know and love you. Visiting a pub in a new place will give you a unique snapshot of the local atmosphere, and will help you dive into the regional culture. Here’s a list of some of the top pubs in Ireland.

An Droichead Beag – Dingle

This pub is impossible to miss because of the bright yellow paint job that decorates the entire outside of the building – minus the signage and window boxes, which are a contrasting deep green.

An Droichead Beag is a traditional pub located in the southern Irish city of Dingle. The interior is lit entirely by candlelight, and the tables are all clustered around a central fireplace. Like many Irish pubs, they host both individual musical acts and sessions – open get-togethers where traditional Irish music is played and anyone who knows the tune can join in. They have a great variety of local liquors in addition to their extensive beer menu.

The Beach Bar – Aughris

This bar might be slightly harder to find than some of the others. In fact, the road in County Sligo where it’s located is unnamed, but if you ask the locals, you’ll be sure to find it. The Beach Bar has stood in the same spot for 300 years, and has become legendary not only in Aughris, but throughout the entire county.

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The bar is located right on the coast, which makes it the perfect spot to stay if you want to enjoy the fresh sea air as well as some traditional Irish food (with plenty of locally-sourced meat) and drink.

The Bernard Shaw – Dublin

Named after one of Ireland’s most famous playwrights, this pub is anything but traditional. While most Irish pubs are known for being small, cramped, and intimate, The Bernard Shaw pub in Dublin is none of these things. It’s a large sprawling complex filled with art, and several buildings clustered around a central, open air courtyard.

In addition to their kitchen, they also host the famous Blue Bus pizza restaurant, which serves Italian style thin crust pizzas out of a giant old double-decker bus. They have spectacular drink deals every night, so you can treat your friends – or yourself.

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