20 Things a Diabetic Needs to Do Before and During Travel

4. Get a Doctor’s Letter

If you’re traveling with syringes, it’s a good idea to carry a note from your doctor giving you permission. I’ve personally never been asked to show this note at security, but I’m always glad to have it just in case.

wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com
wavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

5. Purchase a Medical ID

Hopefully you already own some form of medical identification, but definitely plan to wear a medical ID during your travels. There is nothing worse than feeling yourself going into a bad low, losing the ability to speak clearly, and not even having a necklace with a medical symbol to point at. (Don’t ask me how I know this either.)

I particularly like Lauren’s Hope — lots of great selections no matter what style you want.

Dobs / Shutterstock.com
Dobs / Shutterstock.com

6. Download a Medical Emergency App

In this day and age, there’s no reason not to have a medical emergency app on your phone. Apps like In Case of Emergency will let you log your health information, along with emergency contacts. Red Panic Button and others let you make a scripted text ahead of time and set up the contacts you’d want to send it to, so that in an emergency you don’t have to type or select. (I have one pre-set to send out when my blood sugar goes dangerously low.)

carol.anne / Shutterstock.com
carol.anne / Shutterstock.com